Building Great Neighbourhoods: Pleasantview - Options and Tradeoffs

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This online engagement is now closed.

Pleasantview Neighbourhood Renewal

The Pleasantview Options and Tradeooffs engagement is now closed. You can review the webinars and questions answered by the Pleasantview project team below. Please send any additional questions by email to the project manager at chris.mcmorran@edmonton.ca.

This is a map showing the Pleasantview neighbourhood boundary, all the streets and avenues in Pleasantview, and it highlights the locations within the neighbourhood where design options are proposed.

We are currently looking for your input on the design options developed for Pleasantview’s Neighbourhood Renewal. Please review the design options, learn about the benefits and tradeoffs of each, and provide your feedback through our two surveys until July 30, 2020. You can also ask us questions using the Ask a Question tool below.

The design options show how improvements can address traffic, driving and pedestrian crossing concerns in Pleasantview while also indicating what tradeoffs may be required for each.

We have separated the design options into two sections for easier review:

  • Driving and Street Crossings
  • Biking and Walking Connections and Parks

1. DRIVING AND STREET CROSSINGS
View the Driving and Street Crossings options and tradeoffs and tell us what you think on our Driving and Street Crossings survey:



You can also review the first online event recorded on June 29, 2020 here:


2. BIKING AND WALKING CONNECTIONS AND PARKS AND OPEN SPACES

View the Biking and Walking Connections, and Parks design options and tradeoffs and tell us what you think on our Biking and Walking Connections, and Parks survey.



You can also review the second online event recorded on July 15, 2020 here:


We encourage you to stay informed and engaged!

Pleasantview Neighbourhood Renewal

The Pleasantview Options and Tradeooffs engagement is now closed. You can review the webinars and questions answered by the Pleasantview project team below. Please send any additional questions by email to the project manager at chris.mcmorran@edmonton.ca.

This is a map showing the Pleasantview neighbourhood boundary, all the streets and avenues in Pleasantview, and it highlights the locations within the neighbourhood where design options are proposed.

We are currently looking for your input on the design options developed for Pleasantview’s Neighbourhood Renewal. Please review the design options, learn about the benefits and tradeoffs of each, and provide your feedback through our two surveys until July 30, 2020. You can also ask us questions using the Ask a Question tool below.

The design options show how improvements can address traffic, driving and pedestrian crossing concerns in Pleasantview while also indicating what tradeoffs may be required for each.

We have separated the design options into two sections for easier review:

  • Driving and Street Crossings
  • Biking and Walking Connections and Parks

1. DRIVING AND STREET CROSSINGS
View the Driving and Street Crossings options and tradeoffs and tell us what you think on our Driving and Street Crossings survey:



You can also review the first online event recorded on June 29, 2020 here:


2. BIKING AND WALKING CONNECTIONS AND PARKS AND OPEN SPACES

View the Biking and Walking Connections, and Parks design options and tradeoffs and tell us what you think on our Biking and Walking Connections, and Parks survey.



You can also review the second online event recorded on July 15, 2020 here:


We encourage you to stay informed and engaged!

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

You can:

  • Ask a question directly to the Pleasantview Neighbourhood Renewal project team.

  • Search and view community-submitted questions and official responses.

  • Type your question into the box below and click “Submit”. Answers are provided within five to seven business days of receipt.

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    I live on 60 Ave between 107 and 109 St. I don't see anything in this plan that addresses the fact that, especially during the school year, people use 60 Ave as a high-speed shortcut so as to avoid the lights at 63 Ave and 106 St. To be clear, commuters headed northbound on 106th, turn onto 107th and then onto 60 Ave and drive fast west to 109th. It has been a problem, and a safety risk for years.

    Charles asked 3 months ago

    The options proposed include narrowing 107 Street between 106 Street and 60 Avenue, with the intention of slowing traffic and discouraging shortcutting through this area. Modifications proposed for the intersection of 60 Avenue at 109 Street may slow traffic and discourage speeding as well. 

    Features such as these work as a system and have the potential to slow traffic and discourage shortcutting between them, including along 60 Avenue. We will review this further and consider feedback received as we refine the options and begin developing a draft neighbourhood design. Thank you for sharing your feedback.


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    All these surveys and changes were conducted prior to the 'anticipated speed reduction' to 40 kph, which has been raised by both communities and Council. My question is with the speed reduction to 40 kph within the community...which we had no say to...do we need to expense these options at all?

    Merle Forseth asked 3 months ago

    Thanks for the question. Street design and speed limits work together to accomplish the goals of ensuring that our neighbourhood streets are safe and livable for everyone. When we are reconstructing the ageing residential roads in Pleasantview, it is an opportunity to design roadways that align with the new speed limits. Speed limits and/or signs posting the speed limit may not always deter speeding if the road is designed in such a way that travelling faster feels acceptable. Physical measures contribute to reducing speeds without requiring enforcement and are intended to make it calmer, quieter and safer for people walking, biking, driving and enjoying their neighbourhood

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    Can we rebuild wider "mixed use" sidewalks such at one along 114 avenue between 101 and 106 street? Would this solve the bike lane, parking loss, "sign forest eyesore, and auto vs bike problems easily as along 114 ave?

    Keith H asked 3 months ago

    Thanks for the suggestion. Replacing sidewalks or adding new shared-use pathways similar to the one along 114 Avenue that support walking and biking is possible. Two of the options proposed for the bike route along 106 Street include shared-use pathways, separate from the roadway. We have also proposed options to replace a sidewalk along 111 Street, as well as add new shared-use paths through some of the parks in Pleasantview. We look forward to hearing the feedback on these proposed options.

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    Is it possible for the Caine Memorial Park to be refreshed also? It is looking a bit shabby and could use a refresh. For example, the park sign and picnic table are graffitied and there are weeds everywhere. I love a naturalized look, but this park looks like it has just been neglected and sets the wrong tone when entering the neighbourhood.

    Kimlee asked 3 months ago

    Thanks for sharing your feedback. We will pass these concerns along to our maintenance staff for consideration. As part of the project, we will also continue to assess what opportunities there are to renew amenities in this space.

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    Have you considered putting a fenced dog park in the northwest green space that is along 61 Ave? It would have more space, is not used very often, is more separated from residences, and would provide better access to neighbouring communities than the currently proposed location.

    Jesse asked 3 months ago

    Thank you for sharing this feedback about the proposed location of an off-leash dog space and the suggestion for this alternate location. We will review this further and consider feedback received as we refine the options and begin developing a draft neighbourhood design.

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    I generally like the concept of treed boulevards but concerned if that means I lose my front yard landscaping and if it negatively impacts the slope of my driveway / yard. On 107 street, you are proposing adding a treed boulevard but we are already on a steep slope. If the new sidewalk or boulevard expands into the front yards, then my front driveway and yard will be very steep. I am concerned that it will be challenging for people to physically get up the driveway. Additionally, my neighbours and I are concerned that our landscaping will be ruined. The typical benefits of a treed boulevard on 107 street would not be realized, as we have overhead power lines. In other parts of the neighbourhood, people have beautiful, mature trees in their front yards and cutting into the existing tree roots could damage / kill the trees. Are there any mitigation measures or flexibility in design? Will the proposed designs be flexible and account for the variety and uniqueness of each street? Thanks for any additional clarity.

    LI asked 3 months ago

    Thank you for your comments. There is the potential to move some sidewalks back closer to the property line to create treed boulevards. The tradeoff would be possible impacts to private landscaping features within the City road right-of-way. 

    Another possible way to add boulevard trees on 107 Street would be narrowing the roadway. This has the additional benefits of slowing traffic and shortening crossing distances for people crossing the street. Tradeoffs of this could include people driving needing to yield for safe passing of approaching vehicles. 

    Certain species of trees may be selected that can flourish in spaces where overhead height restrictions may exist that will still add beauty to the street and neighbourhood. 

    Thank you for sharing this as feedback provided on the proposed options will help us understand which benefits and tradeoffs are most important, in order to refine the options and develop a draft design. The design options shown for feedback are flexible and can be adjusted based on the uniqueness of each street. 

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    Regarding the Pocket park on 105St and 55 to 54Ave. I would prefer it had more seating and possibly a feature like a water fountain. Also make the pocket park on 105St and 52Ave the dog park instead of the larger park on 105St and 55 to 54Ave being the dog park. Thanks.

    Cynthia asked 3 months ago

    Thank you for sharing your feedback on the pocket park amenities and the location of an off-leash dog space. We will review this further and consider feedback received as we refine the options and begin developing a draft neighbourhood design. 

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    I prefer option 1 for 106th street bike lanes, as it is consistent with the lanes to the north, minimizing stress to change sides at busy intersections (61 ave). There is also room to pass people in this design, due to the integration with sidewalks. This option would allow for more space for pedestrians as well when the bike lane isn't busy.

    dangao3 asked 3 months ago

    Thank you for sharing your feedback on the 106 Street options. We will consider the feedback received as we refine the options and begin developing a draft neighbourhood design.

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    The 40+ mature, healthy spruce trees on 106 street are highly valued by many in our neighbourhood. Not only are they extremely beautiful, but they also support a diverse ecosystem and help block the noise. 3 of the 4 design options, propose to cut them all down! I thought Council highly values trees as an asset?

    LI asked 3 months ago

    Thanks for your feedback. We heard from many that existing and new trees are highly valued in the neighbourhood, both for their beauty, ecological benefits and many other important features. A noise reduction assessment of the trees along this corridor found that the current amount of trees here do not provide any noise reduction.

    Feedback received on the benefits and tradeoffs of each of the options will be considered as we begin to refine the options and develop a draft neighbourhood design. Further review will be completed on any potential tree impacts in this location. Should any trees end up requiring removal, additional trees would be replanted in the neighbourhood. 

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    First question: Is it possible to have more coniferous, evergreen trees planted in the graveyard? The south side especially could benefit from more evergreen trees so it is green year round, beauty and provides bird habitat. Second question: Many of your proposed park designs include a lot of open spaces. Can you plant rows of trees (i.e. shelter belt) verses sparsely planting the trees along the perimeter. Shelter belts provide wind protection, beauty and create animal/bird habitats. Will enhance our park-like community if we add more thick, naturalized greenery/design.

    Kimlee asked 3 months ago

    Thank you for sharing your feedback. We will consider these suggestions as we begin to refine the options and develop a draft neighbourhood design.