Old Strathcona Public Realm Strategy Phase 3

Engagement has concluded

The Old Strathcona Public Realm Strategy envisions a new future for parks, plazas, parking lots, sidewalks, alleys and streets. The draft strategy, containing the key actions, the overall public realm concept and recommended improvements based on last year’s engagement input, is now ready.

The City of Edmonton is looking for input on the strategy’s key considerations, trade-offs and opportunities. Your input will help with possible adjustments needed for successful implementation. Please review the Old Strathcona Public Realm Strategy website for more information.

Public engagement for this final phase of work will be available from March 18, 2024 to April 7, 2024. The Strategy will be presented to Council's Urban Planning Committee in August 2024.

Phase 3 of this project is at the Advise level of the City’s Public Engagement Spectrum.



The image shows a map of Old Strathcona with 7 key actions.An overall public realm concept shows the seven key actions.

Please watch the video below for an overview of the draft Old Strathcona Public Realm Strategy.


Please review the Old Strathcona Public Realm Strategy website and the draft strategy prior to taking part in our engagement opportunities. You can:

To find out more about the Old Strathcona Public Realm Strategy, visit: edmonton.ca/OldStrathPublicRealm and for general questions or comments, email: oldstrathpublicrealm@edmonton.ca

The Old Strathcona Public Realm Strategy envisions a new future for parks, plazas, parking lots, sidewalks, alleys and streets. The draft strategy, containing the key actions, the overall public realm concept and recommended improvements based on last year’s engagement input, is now ready.

The City of Edmonton is looking for input on the strategy’s key considerations, trade-offs and opportunities. Your input will help with possible adjustments needed for successful implementation. Please review the Old Strathcona Public Realm Strategy website for more information.

Public engagement for this final phase of work will be available from March 18, 2024 to April 7, 2024. The Strategy will be presented to Council's Urban Planning Committee in August 2024.

Phase 3 of this project is at the Advise level of the City’s Public Engagement Spectrum.



The image shows a map of Old Strathcona with 7 key actions.An overall public realm concept shows the seven key actions.

Please watch the video below for an overview of the draft Old Strathcona Public Realm Strategy.


Please review the Old Strathcona Public Realm Strategy website and the draft strategy prior to taking part in our engagement opportunities. You can:

To find out more about the Old Strathcona Public Realm Strategy, visit: edmonton.ca/OldStrathPublicRealm and for general questions or comments, email: oldstrathpublicrealm@edmonton.ca

Engagement has concluded

Use the tool below to submit a question to the project team or see what others have been asking. Answers are posted within 5 business days.

You will need to provide a screen name and email as all questions go through an automated moderation process. Your screen name will be displayed but all other information is kept confidential.

We want to hear about your experience with this digital engagement. Please share your thoughts by going to our online participant feedback form.

All information will:

  • Remain confidential

  • Be considered by the City of Edmonton to improve public engagement activities

  • The strategy is looking good. My concern is about car traffic in the area. Since the addition of scramble intersections at Whyte and 103, 104, and 105 st traffic flow has really backed up. Do you have a plan to alleviate traffic congestion in the area? As the City grows this will only get worse. North/South people can bypass Strathcona on 109 or 99 st. East/west traffic is more difficult. Are you considering connecting 76 Ave through the CP rail lands? They have removed the building that used to be in the way. A 76 ave connection would alleviate some of the pressure on Whyte ave and would give emergency vehicles a much better east/west route. I would also allow you to connect your bike trail from Sask drive to Sherwood Pk Freeway.

    YEG net-zero asked 3 months ago

    Thank you for raising your questions and concerns about traffic congestion in the area, especially in light of the recent changes with the scramble intersections at Whyte and 103, 104, and 105 Streets. It's crucial for us to anticipate and address these challenges as we plan for future growth, and your insights are invaluable in this process.

    As you've pointed out, Whyte Avenue occupies a unique role as both a major destination and a key east-west transportation corridor. Balancing the needs of commuters passing through with those who frequent Whyte Avenue and the Old Strathcona area presents a complex task.

    Looking ahead, it's clear that as Edmonton continues to grow, vehicle congestion will inevitably increase. Traditional solutions like road widenings or additional traffic signals aren't sufficient, particularly in central areas like Old Strathcona. Instead, we're focusing on offering a diverse range of mobility options that are both practical and competitive with personal vehicle travel in terms of time. Enhancing mass transit routes is a central part of this strategy, with the aim of shifting travel patterns and establishing a new equilibrium.

    Regarding emergency vehicle access, our engagement with AHS and EMS has highlighted the benefits of transit lanes in ensuring swift hospital access for emergency vehicles by allowing these services to use the dedicated bus lanes during an emergency. 

    While the 76 Avenue connection holds potential, it's important to note that decisions regarding the railway lie with Canadian Pacific Railway, and the city's influence in this matter is limited. However, we wil conitune to purse this avenue.

    Your suggestion to extend the bike route from Saskatchewan Drive to Sherwood Park Freeway is appreciated. The development of the Gateway greenway and ongoing efforts to expand the bike network eastward are steps in this direction, aiming to provide better regional connections.

    Your feedback is invaluable, and it will be carefully considered as we move forward, particularly during Phase 3 of the Mass Transit project. Rest assured, your concerns will be shared with the project team as we continue to refine our plans. Thank you for your engagement and contribution to shaping our city's future.

  • Dedicated transit lanes in the centre lanes of Whyte Ave may create safety issues for those getting on and off the bus ... are seniors and those with reduced mobility being considered ?

    Poppa asked 3 months ago

    Thank you for sharing your question about the dedicated transit lanes and safety. 

    Seniors and people with reduced mobility are certainly being considered in this work. The Old Strathcona Public Realm Strategy includes four themes to guide how the proposed improvements will serve and benefit all Edmontonians (p.7) -- “Mobility and Movement”, “Comfort and Safety”, “Inclusion and Equity” and “Open Spaces and Activities”.

    While the lane configuration is being determined through the Mass Transit project, if dedicated transit lanes happen to be in the centre, the stops would be located on platforms (protected from cars) next to the transit lanes and close to crosswalks to allow people to safely get on or off. The best way to improve crossing safety is to shorten the crossing, which the centre lane configuration would do by taking what is essentially, a 5-7 lane roadway and creating two, one-way lanes for personal vehicles on each side of the transit lanes. Crossing one lane of vehicle traffic is far easier and safer than crossing multiple traffic lanes.

    Please note that the exact location of the dedicated transit lanes has yet to be determined. The draft strategy’s renderings are intended to help people visualize the public realm with dedicated transit lanes along Whyte Avenue. Other configurations that could be considered include curb-running transit lanes and side-running lanes. The configuration of the transit lanes is still to be determined through the Mass Transit: Implementing for 1.25 Million People project. Stop locations and station design will also be determined in future phases.

    Thank you for your questions and interest in the Old Strathcona Public Realm Strategy.

  • I’m a customer from Lillos Music I drove all the way from Sturgeon county to support a very nice lady that she was to keep her business going memory of her father and it succeeding and now you want to take that away to stop parking along White Avenue. There is a lot of businesses along there that is going to shut down or does that matter. I agree with being environment friendly but this idea is ridiculous. It doesn’t engage activities is going to cause more chaos than anything else. I do not approve of this idea.

    Scott1968 asked 3 months ago

    Thank you for raising your concerns about parking, and we truly value your dedication to supporting local businesses.

    As we move forward with this project, it's important to note that there is ample parking available in the area to accommodate business activities. With over 3,500 parking stalls across both on-street and off-street locations (including private and public parking lots), the current proposal to remove approximately 290 stalls from a city-owned lot is not anticipated to significantly impact parking options.

    That said, we recognize the importance of ensuring accessibility and convenience for all visitors. To address this, we are committed to developing a digital wayfinding system equipped with real-time data. Additionally, we will prioritize accessibility considerations, including the provision of dedicated spaces and drop-off zones, to accommodate various modes of arrival in the area.

    Thank you for you for sharing. 

    This question was responded to on: 04/16/2024.

  • So how did you get to phase 3, saying its the "public's" idea when the public has voiced numerous concerns and rejections on "your" shortsighted ideas/plans, which have been told to the people of this and adjacent neighbourhoods. You gave the public three choices for each of your ideas that were virtually the same with minor augments between them. Where is the plan to move people from southeast Edmonton to south central, such as the U of A hospital, U of A school, Bonnie Doon area, etc. east-west roads are very limited on the south side of Edmonton .. Whyte Ave, Argyll, 51 Ave. Is the plan to build more roads? Is 76Ave going to be converted to a four-lane commuter road? Is there a plan to move traffic once Whyte ave is shut down ? When the existing parking lot is removed, where is the plan to park all these people you have envisioned will come to this area, designed to predominantly to encourage more bars and alcohol consumption? In the adjacent neighbourhoods?? Your plans have zero foresight and are not in favour with the majority of public opinion. Instead of informing, consider consulting and listening!

    adowhan asked 3 months ago

    Thank you for sharing your concerns. The development of the Old Strathcona Public Realm Strategy has been a comprehensive process involving public input, a Community Advisory Committee made up of area businesses and nonprofits, consultation with experts, internal stakeholders, and city leaders. It also incorporates policy direction, including The City Plan, planWhyte, and the Climate Resilient Edmonton: Adaptation Strategy and Action Plan. This is a long-range strategy that will take several years to implement, but it’s important we begin considering how as a City we can support spaces and transportation choices that help us achieve our city building goals while responding to climate change.

    Throughout the phases of this project, we have actively sought and incorporated feedback from the community, including concerns around parking. We value the input received and have made adjustments based on this feedback in conjunction with subject matter experts, including Mobility and the Mass Transit project teams. Through this work, we understand trade-offs are necessary, and parking and vehicle lanes are part of that discussion. There will be continued analysis through future design stages of the Mass Transit project to better assess impacts to traffic flow and shifts to transportation. The vision set out as part of the OSPRS will assist in ensuring this analysis is properly assessed and supports a more climate-resilient and sustainable city.

    Regarding your questions about parking, the Old Strathcona Parking Study demonstrates ample parking spaces in the area, with over 3,500 stalls comprising both on-street and off-street parking (private and public parking lots). The proposed removal of approximately 290 stalls from this existing city-owned parking lot is not expected to impede parking options. However, we acknowledge the need to develop a digital wayfinding system with real-time data, along with accessibility considerations, including dedicated spaces and drop-off zones, to support the various ways people arrive in the area.

    Your feedback is essential to us, and we will continue to engage with the community and seek input as strategy actions move into project phases. Please feel free to reach out if you have further questions or suggestions. 

    Thank you for your engagement in this important dialogue.

    This question was responded to on: 04/16/2024.

  • I have some questions and concerns that centre around the City’s recommendation to replace the Farmers’ Market parking lot with “District Park.” Looking at the timeline on page 58 of the Old-Strathcona-Public-Realm-Strategy document, the majority of these projects are slated to begin construction in the long-term (9+ years). I wanted to ask about the sequence of all of these different projects. For instance, it makes sense to me that Edmonton should build a super robust public transit system (even on weekends) BEFORE removing parking spaces. So, has it been considered that the transit station suggested for Urban Plaza actually be one of the first projects set to complete? It also seems to me that it would be wise to first initiate the removal of the 225 parking spaces lining Whyte Ave before the OSFM parking lot is removed (because Whyte Ave shoppers who - according to the parking study - park on and within one block of Whyte ave) would be pushed back further into the residential streets, into parking in spaces that Farmers Market shoppers would be looking for (especially after their parking lot closed). Have you considered strategizing the projects with a sequence like this in mind? Perhaps only after the rest of the proposed changes occur (and parking availability reduces for everyone on the avenues north and south of Whyte) would be an optimal time to evaluate the usefulness of the OSFM parking lot, including through the week. The City’s parking study reports the following: “On Saturday, free parking was provided to customers of the Farmers Market from 8:00 AM to 3:00 PM and, during that period, the parking lot was well used.” By the way, it should be noted that OSFM customers use the parking lot well before 8am, as shoppers are “allowed” in at 7:30am, but many people (some shift workers) are notorious for coming in to shop for produce and protein that is being set up as early as 5:30am. Wouldn’t it be more useful to find out, on average, how many vehicles use the parking lot (and for how long), so we could know for sure if the estimated free spaces elsewhere will actually be sufficient (like for very a busy days - on July 8, 2023 for example, the market had 16,675 customers)? It is really unfortunate that the City’s parking study was only able to observe the lot one for weekend and didn’t have the budget to observe its use on any weekdays. As the lot’s “landlords” the City could easily install a camera and get an accurate daily reading of the parking lot’s use for the next 10 years, if they wanted to. Old Strathcona Farmers’ market did a survey with their customers in October 2014 and found that 87% of them drive to the market (source: Edmonton Journal article by Paula Simons, 2015). Did the City ever install a sign, table or info booth asking OSFM customers about their parking experience or where they drove from? Because the City’s initial survey found that 65% of respondents (live within a distance that allows them to) walk, wheel or cycle to Old Strathcona. So perhaps the city didn’t engage enough people who drive to the market from neighbourhoods further than walking distance. I get that this City project is trying to cut down traffic for the sake of nearby residents, like me, but the Old Strathcona Farmers’ market wouldn’t be what it is without the shoppers and vendors who visit regularly from the outskirts of Edmonton and farther, places it would currently take 2 hours to bus from now on a Saturday. I understand that the city’s goal is to have “50% of all trips <in Edmonton> completed by transit and active mobility, such as walking, rolling and biking” but it is not logical, currently, to expect all of OSFM customers to change their behaviour and hop on a bus to get there, especially in the winter. There aren’t many year-round Edmonton Farmers Markets (especially to the north of the market) and closing down OSFM parking before transit can be improved will deter people from even going. It seems to me that closing down the parking lot in the name of sustainability will only hinder the hundreds of thousands of people who routinely visit the market, trying to access fresh and local products that generally have a smaller footprint than you’d find at any neighbourhood grocery store. The city would have to introduce pretty impressive parking “wayfinding” technology to beat the current 2 hour free and easy parking that allows people to quickly and safely haul groceries and kids too! Within the city’s plans, “wayfinding” is listed as an option that would keep parking easy but no specific examples of wayfinding are given. Would this be something as simple as installing more signs (the city should install signs to currently point more people to use the OSFM parking lot on weekdays)? Even if an app helped customers find and pay for parking, many would still have to haul their groceries over snow and ice to a random parking space 5-10 long blocks away. How likely is it that the shopping habits of OSFM regulars won’t be affected after losing the ease of the parking lot? It is not very likely at all, and this is not fair to both shoppers and vendors. Also please clarify, what is the actual number of parking spaces that are projected to be left within the 3 blocks on either side (north and south) of Whyte Ave after all of the projected space removals? Because while the total amount of all spaces reported to be in the area sounds like a lot (1543?), once we subtract the (400? spaces from the) customer-only parking for businesses, and subtract the 225 spaces that line Whyte, and subtract the 275 spaces at OSFM - the total number left keep gets getting lower and lower (including the reduction of 107 spaces due to the South Scona development (the Hat at Old Strathcona). What is that number of spaces that is supposed to be left, say in 15 years if all of the projects described in the survey are completed? And how will the percentage of available spaces that supposedly exist now in the area change in the future after a similar number of vehicles are expected to use significantly less parking spaces. I have heard from customers that they struggle to find parking, often on Saturday afternoons. Removing the OSFM parking lot, or at least removing it too soon will just make this worse. Parking has often been a challenge for OSFM shoppers; this is mentioned in several google reviews. The City really shouldn’t be doing anything to make it any more difficult for people who are trying to shop local and enjoy the cultural staple that is the market. And as someone who works at a booth at OSFM, I can tell you that many regular customers are hearing about the potential parking lot closure for the first time (and they are really shocked). It seems clear that the projects presented in this 3 week long survey deserve more time devoted to communicate about them to all of the people they will affect. As well, there needs to be time for city to acquire detailed observation and feedback about current OSFM parking lot use. I understand that the OSFM lease on the parking lot expires next year? How will the city work with the market, its 130 small businesses and hundreds of thousands of shoppers who visit each year to ensure that their voices are heard and prove that the potential loss of the parking lot will not hurt our ability to bring and buy local products for and to Edmontonians (as many people here have been doing for multiple decades). Another question I have is: have any “hybrid” options for the OSFM parking lot been considered? For instance, splitting the lot into a north and south section where one side is a parking lot for the whole week and the other is a people friendly hardscape area that is only open for extra parking on market Saturdays? Removing the chain link fence, and converting the gravel lot into a paved area (with attractive, recycled brick - see the eco friendly lots designed by Kortright in Toronto) would go a long way in making this a more people friendly area. Arguably, it would be easier use the space and set up events there if it were paved compared to lugging equipment or driving food trucks over grass. Line the whole area with trees for summer shade. There is ample room already on the west side of the lot for a bike/pedestrian pathway beside without removing many parking spaces at all. Lining the east side of the lot with a long row of picnic tables would help people enjoy the area any day of the week. And it would be nice to see a plaque/visual display built showing how the OSFM market started there right in that parking lot. I hope that the city thoroughly continues to consider the needs of everyone involved and proceeds in a fair and logical sequence. Do not put the cart before the horse and drive out vehicles, trying to force drivers to take transit before they and the transit system are ready. Sustainable and healthy shopping habits are already in place, and the parking lot allows OSFM customers to do this. https://sustainabletechnologies.ca/living-labs/green-parking-lot/ https://edmontonjournal.com/opinion/simons-park-vs-parking-lot-which-does-old-strathcona-need-more P.S. As a way of reducing vehicles that are currently routed towards Whyte Avenue, the City should be spending a considerable amount of time and energy to get CP Rail to open up 76 Avenue where their yard blocks access between Gateway Blvd and 100th Street. Even if CP is not yet willing to develop the land, just give us one little road through it already. If it has to be a weird, curvy road that loops north along the perimeter of their train yard, so be it, just as long as I can get through there and not have to detour north to Whyte Ave all the time; this is an actual example of unnecessary road use that contributes to traffic congestion in Old Strathcona.

    msc asked 3 months ago

    Thank you for taking the time to share your questions and concerns regarding the Old Strathcona Public Realm Strategy, particularly regarding the proposed replacement of the Farmers' Market parking lot with "District Park." Your detailed feedback and suggestions are appreciated as we continue to consider the various aspects of this project.

    The sequence and timing of the different projects outlined in the Old Strathcona Public Realm Strategy are important considerations, and we agree with your perspective on ensuring that necessary infrastructure, such as robust public transit, is in place before implementing changes that may affect parking availability. We'll be strengthening direction with the strategy to reflect this approach through this next round of revisions in Phase 3.

    Regarding your suggestion that the transit station suggested for Urban Plaza be prioritized, we will take this into consideration as we further refine the implementation timeline. Additionally, your point about initiating the removal of parking spaces along Whyte Avenue before the Farmers' Market parking lot is addressed is noted, and ongoing evaluation of the potential impacts on parking availability in the surrounding areas will be conducted.

    It's important to recognize that while the parking lot has served its purpose for decades, it was never intended as a long-term solution. As outlined in The City Plan, Old Strathcona falls within a priority growth area and will experience significant population growth in the coming decades, necessitating shifts in how people visit and move around in the area. Moreover, addressing the climate emergency outlined in our Climate Resilient Edmonton: Adaptation Strategy and Action Plan requires immediate action to see meaningful changes within the next decade.

    While we understand that parking concerns exist today, we expect travel patterns to change in the future. Adding dedicated transit lanes for bus-based mass transit, both along Whyte Avenue and across the city, will provide a faster and more frequent alternative for many people. The anticipated increase in population, coupled with improved public realm spaces, is expected to strengthen the economic resilience of the area, attracting visitors and tourists regardless of transportation preference.

    Throughout this process, we've worked closely with community stakeholders, including the Old Strathcona Farmers' Market, through the Community Advisory Committee. We understand that these proposed changes may appear challenging, actions within this strategy will take years to develop and we feel confident that the outcomes of increased open space will provide future residents with greater benefits than its current use. 

    Thank you again for your valuable input, and please rest assured that we will carefully consider all aspects of the Old Strathcona Public Realm Strategy as we move forward. Your feedback helps us ensure that the decisions we make are in the best interest of the community.

    This question was responded to on: 04/16/2024.

  • What is the purpose of putting the dedicated transit lane in the center of the street? It seems counter intuitive given that pedestrians need access to it and that the buses will be stopping regularly to pick up passengers. Do passengers need to cross traffic to get to the center bus lane? Do buses need to cross traffic to get to the passengers? Why not have the dedicated transit lanes along the sidewalk and keep the regular vehicle traffic in the center away from pedestrians?

    Cranberrie asked 3 months ago

    Thank you for your inquiry regarding the placement of dedicated transit lanes for the street design.

    We understand your concerns about centre-running transit lanes. Please note that the lane configurations depicted in the images were conceptual and subject to changes in the later design stages of the Mass Transit project. The team is carefully considering several factors such as pedestrian access, safety, bus operations, station locations, and traffic flow impacts.

    While specific design details are yet to be determined, rest assured that pedestrian safety and convenience remain paramount considerations in these preliminary processes. The ultimate goal is to create a Bus Rapid Transit network that efficiently serves both passengers and pedestrians.

    We appreciate your interest and input in this matter. Should you have any further questions or suggestions, please feel free to reach out to us. Your feedback is valuable as we work towards creating a vision for our public realm that benefits the community as a whole.

    This question was responded to on: 04/16/2024.

  • The biggest complaint I hear about the Old Strathcona Farmers’ Market is that people don’t go because there is no parking. Removal of the parking lot will discourage people from going to the market. How has the city considered this given that the market as a whole is made up of many small local businesses that may not survive this change? It is also where many people buy their groceries (often a heavy load) that they will be required to carry many blocks to unload. I don’t think many would go to a grocery store that does not have a parking lot. How has the city addressed this?

    Holliedog3 asked 3 months ago

    Thank you for sharing your concerns about the impact of the Old Strathcona Public Realm Strategy on parking availability, particularity in relation to the Old Strathcona Farmers' Market. The City of Edmonton has taken a thorough approach to developing this strategy, gathering input from various stakeholders, public, subject matter experts and aligning with our long-term city-building goals and climate resilience objectives.

    Our analysis Including the Old Strathcona Parking Study, indicates that there are ample parking spaces in the area, totaling over 3,500 stalls across both on-street and off-street parking options, including private and public lots. While approximately 290 stalls from a city-owned parking lot may be affected, we anticipate that the overall impact on parking availability will be minimal.

    We understand the importance of accessibility, especially for visitors carrying heavy loads of groceries. To address this, we're committed to developing a digital wayfinding system with real-time data to help drivers find parking efficiently. Additionally, we'll prioritize accessibility considerations, including dedicated spaces and drop-off zones, to meet various transportation needs. It's important to note that parking phasing will align with the implementation of the Mass Transit project.

    We recognize that the removal of the parking lot may necessitate adjustments for those who rely on it to visit the market. However, through community engagement, we've found that the benefits of creating open spaces outweigh the need for a parking lot that sees heavy use only one day a week. We believe that shifts in parking strategies will help ease this transition.

    Thank you for sharing your concerns, and please don't hesitate to reach out if you have further questions or suggestions.

    This question was responded to on: 04/16/2024.

  • I have watched the video I have concerns with the plan to remove the existing parking lot giving people access to the Strathcona Market Does City Council believe removing all existing parking lots with green park areas (along with potential changes to existing Residential Restricted Parking ) areas will encourage people to use any form of public transportation? The reason people don’t use public transportation is because many don’t feel safe (I know because we deal with it everyday) at Century Park Removing the existing parking lot that is used by the Public to visit the Strathcona Market will be a death blow to the market If anything why isn’t the City doing any proactive planning in keeping the Strathcona Market accessible and vibrant to all Edmontonians If the Stratchcona Market finds it impossible to stay viable due to lack of appropriate parking for its visitors you can only imagine the slow demise of the rest of that area and the existing businesses who are already struggling My family dentist has had to move to another location away from the area as the once dedicated parking lot his clients used is gone making way for a Condo development Widening the sidewalks… seriously….there goes more public parking spaces Please reconsider the impact this plan will have on the lifeblood of the Strathcona Whyte Ave residents, business owners and the Public

    Blue Quill 1 asked 3 months ago

    Thank you for taking the time to watch the video and share your thoughts on the proposed changes to parking in the Old Strathcona area. We appreciate you sharing your concerns.

    The OSPRS and its actions may span over several years for full implementation. This plan embodies the policy direction set forth by City Council and Administration, shaped by the feedback gathered from thousands of Edmontonians through initiatives like the City Plan, plan Whyte, and phases 1 and 2 of this strategy. While we aim to address the current needs of residents and businesses, we must also consider the requirements and amenities necessary for future generations of Edmontonians who will live, work, and visit the area to develop a more climate resilient and sustainable city. Given its status as a priority growth area, this region is evolving rapidly, underscoring the necessity for our strategy to reflect a long-term vision.

    The project team is exploring options for phasing actions and the proposed reduction in parking. Additionally, we invite you to review the Old Strathcona Parking Study completed in 2022, which highlights the area has ample parking with utilization rates hovering around 60 to 70 percent, suggesting that future parking reductions will still leave sufficient parking availability. However, we acknowledge the need to develop a digital wayfinding system with real-time data, along with accessibility considerations, including dedicated spaces and drop-off zones, to support the various ways people arrive in the area.

    Regarding your concerns about transit safety, the City of Edmonton and our partners are dedicated to ensuring transit safety for everyone and actively working to address issues. You can find more information on our efforts by visiting the Enhanced Transit Safety Plan and the Transit Safety and Tools Resource . If you have further questions or feedback regarding Transit Safety, you can text or call Transit Watch at 780-442-4900.

    This question was responded to on: 04/16/2024.

  • So your plan is to eliminate the largest parking space in the Old Strathcona neighborhood, which will impact ALL businesses and events. Have you spoken to some of the big key players in this area about how that lot is currently utilized and the impacts it will have if removed? Fringe Festival? Ice on Whyte? Whyte Ave Art Walk? This plan sounds like another hurdle or even full road block for these existing events that generate thousands in local revenue. Frankly, this plan will cause more damage to these existing events by putting bigger barriers to attend the events, while the events industry is already receiving major challenges due to cuts in government funding. Have y'all even looked at that lot on a Saturday for the farmers markets or any major Whyte Ave event? There's rarely room, so where will all those cars go once this parking lot is removed?

    sreid asked 3 months ago

    Thank you for sharing your concerns regarding the proposed removal of the City-owned parking lot in Old Strathcona. We understand your apprehension about the potential impacts on businesses and events in the area.

    Your points about the significance of the parking lot for major events such as the Fringe Festival, Ice on Whyte, and the Whyte Ave Art Walk are understood. We recognize the vital role these events play in the community and the local economy. Throughout the development of the strategy, the Project Team consulted with key stakeholders, including event organizers and business owners and with representatives participating on our Community Advisory Committee. Our goal is to make improvements to the public realm that  reflect policy direction and community feedback while contributing positively to the overall vibrancy and activation of the neighbourhood.

    Additionally, the Old Strathcona Parking Study  published in 2023, highlights the ample parking spaces in the area, with over 3,500 stalls comprising both on-street and off-street parking (private parking lots). The proposed removal of approximately 290 stalls from the existing City-owned parking lot is not anticipated to impede parking options moving forward. However, we acknowledge the need for improved parking wayfinding and accessibility considerations, including drop-off zones, to support the transition of these actions as they move into project phases. 

    The City of Edmonton is committed to working with events and festivals to support their continued success. It's important to note that this area is evolving, and will see a significant increase in population in the coming years. We need to ensure the strategy addresses the needs of future Edmontonians while considering the transitioning of this work to align with other supporting initiatives, including the rollout of Mass Transit along Whyte Avenue and our Climate Resilient Edmonton: Adaptation Strategy and Action Plan . These changes won’t happen quickly, with the proposed actions anticipated to take several years to implement. However, it’s important that the city has a vision in place, supported by public feedback and policy. This ensures that the plan reflects the needs of the future while providing a roadmap to respond to developmental pressures.

    If you have further questions or would like to discuss this matter in more detail, please don't hesitate to reach out. We are here to listen and collaborate towards a shared vision for Old Strathcona.

    This question was responded to on: 04/15/2024.

  • Thank you for what looks like an exciting and innovative plan to keep the Old Strathcona area vital and alive. However, I would like to express a concern about the step 1 proposal to eliminate the parking lot on Gateway and replace it with a park. Old Strathcona has many wonderful features, but one of the things it actively promotes itself as is a theatre district. As such, it draws people from all over the city, and especially during events like the Fringe, visitors from across the country and even the world. Eliminating nearby parking that allows people to easily attend these events or visit nearby businesses would have a negative rather than positive effect on the vitality of the area. Your video seems to conceive Edmonton as a summer city twelve months of the year. However, your proposed park would only be utilized effectively for about 5 months of the year and only in good weather; parking is needed for all 12 months, especially with the majority of theatre and live arts events concentrated over the fall, winter and early spring months. In fact, with winter cutting down on pedestrian and biking traffic, and travel time and safety continuing to be issues on public transit (a friend's daughter was recently jumped and badly beaten at a LRT station) the need for parking is likely to increase over the winter months. Also, looking at this green space, I'm reminded of how another nearby "green space" in the Old Strathcona area was repurposed by some local residents into a nice tent city. When I look at the image in your proposed concept I see a bigger and greener area for well-heeled Edmontonians to meet during the warm summer months. What if those who are less fortunate simply see it as a bigger and better encampment space not only for the warmer months but the colder ones as well? For all these reasons, I hope you will rethink the part of the plan to replace the parking lot with a park. Thank you.

    MJD asked 3 months ago

    First and foremost, we are extremely sorry to hear about the assault on your friend’s daughter. Safety for everyone on public transit is of the utmost importance, and the City of Edmonton is actively working to address challenges through collaborative efforts with community partners. You can find more information on our efforts by visiting the Enhanced Transit Safety Plan and the Transit Safety and Tools Resource . If you have further questions or feedback regarding Transit Safety, you can text or call Transit Watch at 780-442-4900.

    The Old Strathcona Public Realm Strategy is part of a broader effort outlined in planWhyte and The City Plan, which aims to address the needs of future Edmontonians and respond to development pressures in priority growth areas like Old Strathcona. With a significant population increase anticipated in the coming years, the City of Edmonton is committed to ensuring that our public spaces meet the evolving needs of future residents and visitors while also advancing our climate-resilient objectives and open space targets. As the strategy moves into project phases, there will be additional opportunity for community feedback on design details that will incorporate usability in all seasons.

    It’s important to consider that strategy implementation will take years with transportation options expanding during that time. Having a long-term vision is necessary to ensure the needs of future residents and visitors are considered as this area evolves. 

    Thank you once again for sharing your thoughts.

    This question was responded to on: 04/15/2024.