Terrace Heights Supportive Housing Good Neighbour Plan and Building Design

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Because of public health restrictions, the City cannot host in-person public engagement as we normally would. Instead, we are using Engaged Edmonton to gather community feedback until 11:55 PM on September 22, 2020.


Have your say:

  1. Watch the video below to learn more about the project.
  2. Fill out a survey on the Good Neighbour Plan and building design.
  3. Ask a question about the project in the tool below.


Because of public health restrictions, the City cannot host in-person public engagement as we normally would. Instead, we are using Engaged Edmonton to gather community feedback until 11:55 PM on September 22, 2020.


Have your say:

  1. Watch the video below to learn more about the project.
  2. Fill out a survey on the Good Neighbour Plan and building design.
  3. Ask a question about the project in the tool below.


Ask a Question About the Project

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    I am scared for our children in the community, as we have so far great shared park and library near by. With supportive housing these individuals will be wondering around to where children will be playing. I was excited to see the beautiful library and Starbucks and small mall built near by. But logistically I do not understand how this supportive housing will help businesses that are already struggling with this. I think the city should focus more on Improving this area, nice dog parks and taking care of the wild Coyotes that living in the ravine. I feel that there are other much better places logistically that make sense to place supportive housing: The downtown core where people are sleeping on the street and getting food near by. There is also access to daily work and community support services in walking distance in this area. I would like to see published studies and all stakeholder consultations done by the City to propose this Project.

    Ivanna.lewington Asked 5 days ago

    We know we can’t solve our City’s homelessness crisis by concentrating all our efforts in one or two central communities. That’s why the City has set a goal of building 900 units of supportive housing by 2024. These is one of the first  of those sites, and more will be built in communities across Edmonton.

    The design, construction, appearance, physical integrity, and maintenance of supportive housing provides an environment that is home-like, functional, safe and secure, conducive to residents/tenants’ stability, and appropriate for the surrounding neighbourhood. Supportive housing also offers wraparound services and daily programming on-site, reducing the need to be located close to services in the city’s core.

    We understand that community members have concerns and that the safety of children is always top of mind. Inspector Dan Jones of the Edmonton Police Service addressed this issue in our September 1 livestream. You can watch his answer here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DRIe8yjgWf0&t=6096s

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    I have lived in the Ottewell area for 20 years now and have experienced a steady increase in property and vehicle theft in the past few years. I really do not think it is fair to put this type of housing into our neighborhood!! Who makes this type of decision?!!

    Urban Legend Asked 5 days ago

    Residents in supportive housing have their basic needs provided for, including meals, health care services and other supports. Some residents work, go to school, or volunteer while others focus on regaining stability in their lives. 

    Individuals are vetted based on their commitment to maintain housing and suitability for a particular building. The operator will establish standards of behaviour for residents living in supportive housing.

    We have no evidence to suggest that supportive housing increases crime, and in fact, supportive housing has proven to reduce residents’ interactions with police. An analysis of a supportive housing site in downtown Edmonton saw a 46 per cent drop in interactions between residents and police in the 2 years after they moved in, compared to the 2 years before.

    The City has also studied the impact of non-market housing on the safety of five core neighbourhoods and found there was no correlation between crime and non-market housing, including supportive housing.

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    What happens if crime does increase once this supportive housing is up and running? Can anything be done to reverse the situation?

    Urban Legend Asked 5 days ago

    Supportive housing is a home. Residents of supportive housing are committed to maintaining housing and find a sense of safety, stability and community in their new home.

    We have no evidence to suggest that supportive housing increases crime, and in fact, supportive housing has proven to reduce residents’ interactions with police. An analysis of a supportive housing site in downtown Edmonton saw a 46 per cent drop in interactions between residents and police in the 2 years after they moved in, compared to the 2 years before.

    The City has also studied the impact of non-market housing on the safety of five core neighbourhoods and found there was no correlation between crime and non-market housing, including supportive housing.

    The Good Neighbour Plan will include a community contact that neighbours can reach out to if they have concerns about the buildings or its residents. It will also contain an issues resolution process.

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    Does it matter that there is a skate park where young children play within 200 meters of the proposed Terrace Heights supportive housing?

    Urban Legend Asked 5 days ago

    Residents of supportive housing are vetted based on their commitment to maintain housing and suitability for a particular building.  The operator will establish standards of behaviour for residents living in supportive housing and provide continuous wraparound services to meet their needs. No one would be housed somewhere that would violate any residency restrictions they may have.  

    We understand that community members have concerns and that the safety of children is always top of mind. Inspector Dan Jones of the Edmonton Police Service addressed this issue in our September 1 livestream. You can watch his answer here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DRIe8yjgWf0&t=6096s

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    Do nearby residents actually have a say if this supportive housing initiative goes ahead? Or has the decision already been made?

    Urban Legend Asked 5 days ago

    City Council has approved the sale of the land to Homeward Trust, pending the completion of this engagement process and rezoning approvals. The City's engagement is focused on a Good Neighbour Plan, a tool for developing and maintaining a positive relationship between supportive housing and its community. 

    All input from this engagement process will contribute to a What We Heard Report and be shared with the community. Once an Operator is selected, they will review the community's feedback and create a final Good Neighbour Plan to support good communication, effective issue resolution and relationship-building with neighbours.

    The City is also collecting input on the proposed rezoning for this site. If you would like to share your feedback, please visit the rezoning engagement page. Feedback will contribute to a What We Heard Report that will be shared with City Council at the rezoning public hearing.

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    Thank you for the opportunity to have this excellent project in the neighborhood. I believe that housing diversity and diversity of residents is important for the health of every community. And I believe the responsibility to end homelessness is a responsibility for ALL of Edmonton. Homeward Trust is a remarkable organization and I am very pleased they will be in charge of this endeavor. The drawings of the proposed building look wonderful and will provide a fresh look to the neighborhood. Every neighborhood needs to be revitalized on a regular basis. Well done on this project. I look forward to the outcome!

    jdhanley Asked 9 days ago

    Please be sure to share your feedback through the supportive housing survey here as well. All feedback will be analyzed and contribute to a What We Heard Report for your community. Thank you.

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    The Capilano area is not a supportive community of supportive housing. I have not talked to one person that wants supportive housing in this area. Drug addicts and criminals will never be welcomed in the Capilano area. There are a large number of seniors in the Capilano area that are very concerned about their physical and psychological safety . I have been involved in two supportive housing round table meetings and feel my physical and psychological safety concerning as a senior, have been down played and ignored by the supportive housing team. I do not appreciate this type of condescending and abusive treatment , when I'm taking my time to give my input concerning supportive housing.

    Safety Concerns Asked 12 days ago

    The City understands that neighbours of the proposed supportive housing sites have questions and concerns, and we are here to listen and provide as much information as possible. 

    We appreciate that you have taken the time to provide feedback and want to ensure you that your feedback will be captured in a What We Heard Report. In terms of safety concerns, you may find it helpful to watch a recording of a virtual information session held with experts on supportive housing, including Insp. Daniel Jones of the Edmonton Police Service. In his experience, crime and social disorder associated with homelessness is a result of someone being homeless and trying to survive in extremely difficult circumstances.

    Once someone has the safety and stability of housing and the support they require to meet their daily needs, that type of activity tends to drop off. At one supportive housing site downtown, interactions between police and residents fell by 46% in the 2 years after moving in compared to the 2 years before. You can watch the video at this link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=2169&v=DRIe8yjgWf0&feature=emb_logo There are links in the description that will allow you to jump to the topics that interest you most. 

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    Why do brand new buildings need to be built? If the city is wanting to act so quickly, why don't they purchase existing apartment complexes to use for this? How did the city decide that these neighbourhoods would be the best for these individuals? For example, terrace heights does not have the best public transit. There is only really the #1 that goes by there and there fewer places of employment. Also, why are all of the proposed building designs so ugly? They do not fit with the mature communities that they are being built in.

    Arland Hudkins Asked 16 days ago

    Supportive housing has design standards that may not be found in a typical apartment building. That includes a main door that leads directly to a space for staff so that guests can be welcomed and monitored, durable materials and energy efficient fixtures to support financial sustainability, and environmental design considerations that help maintain safety for residents and the community. 

    The City of Edmonton helps meet the need for supportive housing by offering City-owned land in its inventory. These sites were selected because they are ready for development, well integrated with the surrounding land uses and built form, and close to amenities and services for residents, like transit, grocery stores, and recreation opportunities, like rec centres, libraries and parks. The designs for the building are not final. You can provide your input through the survey on this Engaged Edmonton webpage.

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    Put supportive housing on City owned land in light industrial park areas to avoid conflict with any communities in the city.

    Safety Concerns Asked 20 days ago

    Industrial areas are not suitable places for people to live. The land use activities that take place there can present health and safety risks, or nuisance conditions that can interfere with personal health and well being. In addition, industrial areas tend not to offer the types of amenities and support that residents need on a daily basis, such as frequent transit and nearby shops and services. Residents of supportive housing are most successful when they have the opportunity to integrate into a supportive community. 

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    In order to reduce conflict between City Hall and communities impacted by supportive housing, Edmonton should use its large land inventory in Lambton Ind., Eastgate Bus. Park, Strathcona Junction or Wagner. As long as the supportive housing clients have good bus transportation.

    Safety Concerns Asked 20 days ago

    When considering potential locations for supportive housing, the City looks at sites in residential areas that are well integrated with the surrounding land uses and built form, and close to amenities and services for residents, like transit, grocery stores, and recreation opportunities, like rec centres, libraries and parks.

    It's also important to note that supportive housing is a home for the people who live there. Some residents volunteer in their communities or work, if they're able; they are more successful when they have the opportunity to integrate into a supportive community. Community conflict that can arise from social disorder related to homelessness — litter, needle debris or disruptive behaviour, for example — is a symptom of a lack of housing and appropriate support. Supportive housing is part of the solution.