LDA23-0188 Highlands

Engagement has concluded

October 19 Update: You can now access the What We Heard Report.

Get involved!

You are invited to learn more about the application and share feedback online. The following engagement opportunities are open from September 18 until October 2, 2023.

What Happens Next

We will use feedback shared to make sure our review of the application is as complete as possible. After engagement is closed, feedback received will be summarized in a What We Heard report for City Council so that they know your perspective prior to making a decision.

October 19 Update: You can now access the What We Heard Report.

Get involved!

You are invited to learn more about the application and share feedback online. The following engagement opportunities are open from September 18 until October 2, 2023.

What Happens Next

We will use feedback shared to make sure our review of the application is as complete as possible. After engagement is closed, feedback received will be summarized in a What We Heard report for City Council so that they know your perspective prior to making a decision.

Engagement has concluded

Use the tool below to submit a question to the file planner or see what others have been asking. Answers are posted within 5 business days. When needed, we will also work with the applicant to provide an answer. 

You will need to provide a screen name and email as all questions go through an automated moderation process. Your screen name will be displayed but all other information is kept confidential. 

Ask a question directly to the City file planner who is processing the application.

  • The city is proposing a total overhaul to the zoning bylaw, allowing commercial developments like this one, saying that "it will make the city more vibrant, affordable, climate-friendly and economically successful.” Can you please tell us HOW, precisely our having any commercial establishment at this location in Highlands WILL make our neighborhood more affordable, climate resilient, and economically successful?

    PMcK asked 7 months ago

    Thank you for your question.

    When reviewing a specific rezoning application, like this one, our review currently includes an analysis of the proposed rezoning's impacts on surrounding infrastructure (i.e., roads, water and sewer systems), overall compatibility of the proposed zone with surrounding land uses, and Council approved policies such as The City Plan.

    All questions and comments related to Zoning Bylaw Renewal can be directed to the October 16, 17 & 18, 2023 public hearing. More information on public participation in Council meetings may be found here.

  • With the demolition of Northlands Coliseum along with the Edmonton EXPO Centre and the Northlands horseracing track, you have 160-acre area that could be transformed into housing and commercial spaces. One acre is enough for five single-family homes, such that we have enough space there for at least 800 single-family homes or a HUGE number of multi-residential properties plus commercial developments. Then if you add in other areas in central Edmonton that sit vacant and could be transformed into residential developments, like our former Municipal Airport with 536 acres, where up to 30,000 Edmontonians were supposed to live - there is ample opportunities for inner city densification. Therefore, WHY are these (and other) potential and ideal sites for densification NOT a much higher priority, that could serve as a template for developing city council’s idealized inner core, rather than disrupting existing, established residential neighborhoods like Highlands?

    PMcK asked 7 months ago

    Thank you for your question. The redevelopment of Blatchford and the Exhibition lands continue to be priorities for the City. Also, The City Plan provides policy direction to invest in and nurture priority growth areas across the City to enhance equitable access to amenities and public services, and expand infrastructure capacity to enable future redevelopment and intensification in alignment with the priority growth areas. More information on the priority growth areas may be found in The City Plan. These projects do not preclude private landowners from coming forward with applications to rezone their land.

  • What is the City's vision for the community to have a one-off commercial lot in the middle of a residential area? Infill is not piecemeal.

    KarrenBrown asked 7 months ago

    Thank you for your question. Community of Communities is one of the big city moves identified in The City Plan. The plan encourages 15-minute communities that allows Edmontonians to easily meet their daily needs within a 15-minute travel time, which includes walking, biking or transit trips from their homes.

  • We are being told: “We are trying to really lean into the idea of 15-minute communities. We want people to be able to walk to a corner store, to be able to have easy access to daycare, and everyday amenities they need in close proximity to their home,” QUESTION: How many city blocks can the average person walk in 15 minutes? About 5 to 10 blocks, realistically, in any direction. To accomplish that means that our city must be planning to have a grocery store, daycare, medical clinic, and other amenities all in very close proximity. Therefore, that would require an INCREDIBLY DENSIFIED residential neighborhoods to support the commercial development. Does the city have targeted numbers for the level of commercial densification that they are trying to achieve - and specifically throughout our residential Highlands Community?

    PMcK asked 7 months ago

    Thank you for your question. 

    The 15-minute communities concept in The City Plan is not limited to walking distance. The plan encourages 15-minute communities that allows Edmontonians to easily meet their daily needs within a 15-minute travel time, which includes walking, biking or transit trips from their homes. The City does not have targeted numbers for the commercial densification. However, when reviewing a specific rezoning application, like this one, our review currently includes an analysis of the proposed rezoning's impacts on surrounding infrastructure (i.e., roads, water and sewer systems), overall compatibility of the proposed zone with surrounding land uses, and Council approved policies such as The City Plan.

  • The observation was made that once these zoning changes gets passed they are irreversible. BUT, Ashley Salvador says that’s not the case. “This is not a one and done. It’s not like we pass the zoning bylaw and never talk about it again. There is an iterative process that will happen afterwards if adjustments need to be made.” Now, that may sound good in theory, but how is that going to realistically work? Where are the specific safe guards for reviewing these kinds of zoning changes after they have been made and for undoing mistakes that have then been discovered?

    PMcK asked 7 months ago

    Thank you for your question.

    The review of this application is based on the current (CB1) Low Intensity Business Zone. If this application proceeds to a Public Hearing for Council’s consideration in its current state, Council will be adjudicating on the CB1 Zone, but can consider the zoning equivalency in the draft Zoning Bylaw 20001. Future amendments to the Zoning Bylaw require advertising for public awareness and can only be considered at another Public Hearing.

    All questions and comments related to Zoning Bylaw Renewal can be directed to the October 16, 17 & 18, 2023 public hearing. More information on public participation in Council meetings may be found here.

  • Our city is proposing a total overhaul to the zoning bylaw, which will now allow commercial developments like this one in the middle of one of Edmonton's oldest neighborhoods. Our Mayor says ““I firmly believe that Edmontonians are ready to embrace this change.” Given that there is survey research that shows the vast majority of our citizens do NOT even know about these zoning changes, on the basis of what specific facts, is our mayor basing his strong beliefs?

    PMcK asked 7 months ago

    Thank you for your question.

    All questions and comments related to Zoning Bylaw Renewal can be directed to the October 16, 17 & 18, 2023 public hearing. More information on public participation in Council meetings may be found here. Specific questions to the Mayor may be sent to his office.

  • Can we know what type of business is planned? It is hard to give input without knowing the full plan.

    Angie asked 7 months ago

    Thank you for your question. The applicant has informed the City staff that they currently intend to have a child care services use on the subject site. However, if the Council approves the proposed rezoning at the future public hearing, all the uses allowed in the CB1 Zone can be considered at the subject site if they change their intent or if ownership of the property were to change.

  • Is there any way to prohibit the use of the building for yet another mediclinic? We have so many in the neighborhood and I can't imagine that the neighborhood is in need of any more.

    MHall asked 7 months ago

    Thank you for your question. If the Council approves the proposed CB1 Zone at a future Public Hearing, it will allow the health services use on the subject site; however, this is only one of many other commercial uses allowed by this zone. Other opportunities include convenience retail stores, business support services, among others.