King Edward Park Supportive Housing Good Neighbour Plan and Building Design

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Engagement has concluded

Thank you for participating in the online engagement. The online survey and ask a question tool are now closed.

You can still view the questions and answers that were submitted on this page. For further information, visit the King Edward Park Supportive Housing page.


Because of public health restrictions, the City cannot host in-person public engagement as we normally would. Instead, we are using Engaged Edmonton to gather community feedback until 11:55 PM on September 22, 2020.


Have your say:

  1. Watch the video below to learn more about the project.
  2. Fill out a survey on the Good Neighbour Plan and building design.
  3. Ask a question about the project in the tool below.



Want to learn more?

Visit our FAQ and read about the experiences of supportive housing residents.




Thank you for participating in the online engagement. The online survey and ask a question tool are now closed.

You can still view the questions and answers that were submitted on this page. For further information, visit the King Edward Park Supportive Housing page.


Because of public health restrictions, the City cannot host in-person public engagement as we normally would. Instead, we are using Engaged Edmonton to gather community feedback until 11:55 PM on September 22, 2020.


Have your say:

  1. Watch the video below to learn more about the project.
  2. Fill out a survey on the Good Neighbour Plan and building design.
  3. Ask a question about the project in the tool below.



Want to learn more?

Visit our FAQ and read about the experiences of supportive housing residents.




CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.
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    You did not answer my question about the amendments required to bypass bylaw 7188. You said there would be an amendment and that it only applies to public utilities. You didn't say what the amendment would be or why it is needed. Bylaw 7188 sets out specific protocols that need to be followed to do any changes to land near the ravine. It sounds like you are just trying to avoid the proper protocols (that are in place for a reason) to save time and money doing proper assessments. Why does it need to be amended. What are the amendments. What exactly is putting public utilities in going to do to the land. Are the bulldozing the trees that are already there? I note that this proposed amendment isn't on the public sign and was only included in a letter sent to a very small amount of people.

    kbgriffi asked 8 months ago

    This rezoning application proposes to rezone a 0.32 ha portion of the Millcreek Ravine South from the existing (A) Metropolitan Recreation Zone to (PU) Public Utility Zone and (RA7) Low Rise Apartment Zone.  

    There is an existing EPCOR Drainage facility located on a 0.09 ha portion between the proposed 0.23 ha (RA7) Low Rise Apartment Zone portion and the top of ravine bank. This 0.09 ha sub-portion is proposed to be redesignated to (PU) Public Utility Zone as the more appropriate zoning for the existing use on this piece of land. At this time, there are no plans to modify the existing public utilities portion including any impacts to the existing vegetation within this area.

    The associated amendment to the North Saskatchewan River Valley Area Redevelopment Plan (ARP) (Bylaw 7188) is proposed to better align with the proposed rezoning to the (PU) and (RA7) designations. This is to allow for the continuation of the existing drainage facility and removes this area, and the developable 0.23 ha upland portions at the corner of 93 Street and 82 Avenue from the ARP boundaries. Overall, the boundary amendment extracts the subject 0.32 ha lands but allows for continued opportunity for the protection of the Mill Creek Ravine South and for active/and passive recreational space within the ravine area.

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    Will the "What We Heard" report that will be presented to council, be available to the public to read prior to the council's meeting on the rezoning?

    RF asked 8 months ago

    The target date for City Council Public Hearing and decision by City Council is December 8, 2020. 

    The Administration Report will include a summary of the engagement process and feedback received and will be posted a couple weeks before the hearing on the Council Public Hearing agenda <https://www.edmonton.ca/city_government/council-committee-meetings.aspx>. 

    We also send out the a notice of public hearing to interested residents through our mailing list. To add your name to the mailing list you can contact the file planner at marty.vasquez@edmonton.ca. For more information please visit: https://engaged.edmonton.ca/lda18-0690kingedpkrezoning?preview=true&tool=qanda#tool_tab 

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    When is council scheduled to vote on the rezoning? Will this be made public? Will it be posted on any of these websites? Will I receive an email on the date if I have signed up for further communication on this project's website?

    RF asked 8 months ago

    The target date for City Council Public Hearing and decision by City Council is December 8, 2020. 


    The Administration Report including a summary of the engagement process and feedback received will be posted on the Council Public Hearing agenda <https://www.edmonton.ca/city_government/council-committee-meetings.aspx>.  

    We also send out the a notice of public hearing to interested residents through our mailing list. To add your name to the mailing list you can contact the file planner at marty.vasquez@edmonton.ca. For more information please visit: https://engaged.edmonton.ca/lda18-0690kingedpkrezoning?preview=true&tool=qanda#tool_tab  

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    Are there any supportive housing projects in neighbourhoods that councillors or the mayor live in?

    RF asked 8 months ago

    Supportive housing is a home and the people who live in it have a right to privacy, just like any other citizen. Out of respect for residents, staff and operators, it is the City's established practice not to share the addresses of supportive housing developments in which it is not directly involved. The City has a goal of building 900 units of supportive housing by 2024. These were the first four sites selected; there will be more in communities throughout Edmonton.

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    Is there the possibility of the city looking into ways to reduce the harm that the transient populations in the ravine are already causing to help this project work better? For example, a proper stair case that would direct ravine traffic away from the alley behind the proposed shelter? Or better response times for 311 when we call about needles and camps in that alley?

    kbgriffi asked 8 months ago

    Thank you for your question and suggestions. If you have not done so already, we invite you to share this input through the survey linked on this page so that it can be captured in the What We Heard Report for this engagement process.

    We understand that communities have serious concerns about needle debris and encampments; that is why the City has set standards for responding to these issues. Edmontonians can call 311 for needle pick up on public property seven days a week between 8 am and 4 pm and we will aim to have the needle(s) collected within two hours of the initial call. If a call is received after hours and poses an immediate threat, Fire Rescue Services will respond to the call. The closure and clean-up of encampments is prioritized by level of risk posed to the health and well-being of people in the encampment and the surrounding community. You can find out more about the encampment closure process here: https://www.edmonton.ca/city_government/documents/PDF/EncampmentResponseFlowCharts.pdf.  

    It's important to note that the social disorder associated with homelessness - like litter, needle debris or disruptive behaviour - is a symptom of a lack of housing and support. Supportive housing is part of the solution.



     
     

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    Why was the sign advertising the project hidden/placed behind the construction equipment so it wasn’t visible to the public? What communities do those advocating (specifically the panelists) reside in? Why would a facility like this be placed in by the ravine where there is already a huge issue with transients, crime and no security? Statistics show both in the US and Canada that community housing does put the community at a higher risk as well as will decrease of property values.

    KB asked 8 months ago

    In response to your questions:
    - The sign was placed on the corner of 82 Avenue and 93 Street. If someone has moved the sign from its original location, we will look into this and ensure it remains visible to the public.
    - The live stream question and answer session was an opportunity to answer specific questions that residents submitted throughout the engagement process and wanted answers to; it was not an advocacy session.
    -The location was selected because it is a vacant, City-owned parcel that is ready for development, well integrated with the surrounding land uses and built form, and close to amenities for residents, including transit. Rather than a walk-in, temporary shelter, the proposed supportive housing would operate more like an apartment building. We have confirmed the site's proximity to the ravine is not considered a barrier to the project’s successful operation.
    -We have no evidence to suggest that supportive housing increases crime. Insp. Dan Jones of the Edmonton Police Service addressed this issue in our September 1 info session. You can watch the discussion on this topic here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DRIe8yjgWf0&feature=youtu.be
    - There is no conclusive evidence to suggest non-market housing, including supportive housing, negatively affects surrounding property values. For more information, you can watch the discussion on this topic here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NIkvH3QtX8U

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    In a previous question, from JTD, he asked, "What are the thresholds in regards to community approval? a simple majority for or against deciding if the project goes through? It sounds like from the FAQ's section that the development is set in stone. the community engaugment portion of the conditions is more or less just to help the service provider guidance on how they develop plans. is this correct and if not could you clairify? JTD asked 16 days ago. Twice I've asked the same question for clarification and three times, once to JTD and twice to me, I feel you have evaded the question with a vague answer. Please don't tell me about the process. I understand the process. So I will ask again in a different way... Is this a case of the City nodding its head saying community engagement is important, but in reality, it isn't... the project will go ahead anyway, even if there's a majority- 50%, 75%, even 100% opposition from the community at the stage of "the completion of this engagement process and rezoning approvals." What is the reality of the community possibly "killing" the project?

    RF asked 8 months ago

    Ultimately, City Council is responsible for making the final decision on the proposed rezoning and plan amendment. Community feedback will be summarized in a What We Heard Report and shared with City Council to ensure it is aware of the views of surrounding residents before making a decision. 

    While all feedback will be considered, there are not specific thresholds. This is consistent with other rezoning processes. If Council approves the rezoning and plan amendment, the input collected during the public engagement process will be shared with Homeward Trust to consider as they finalize building designs and with the operator to help them create a final Good Neighbour Plan. 

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    What about the fact that this plan proposes that the land needs to be rezoned and removed from the ATP (bylaw 7188)? Isn't this Bylaw meant to protect valuable and vulnerable river and ravine land and why isn't this being talked about?

    kbgriffi asked 8 months ago

    The project site in King Edward Park is proposed to be a low-rise apartment zone and the adjacent lot (between the development site and the Mill Creek Ravine) is proposed to be a public utility lot. The Plan will otherwise remain in effect and the amendment will not alter how it applies to the river valley and ravine system that it covers.

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    Why would you choose a location across the YESS and beside Millcreek Ravine, when there are already issues with homeless camps in the ravine and at-risk youth across the street?

    RF asked 8 months ago

    The location was selected because it is a vacant, City-owned parcel that is ready for development, well integrated with the surrounding land uses and built form, and close to amenities for residents, including transit.

    The YESS shelter serves a different client group and provides a different type of service. Rather than a walk-in, temporary shelter, the proposed supportive housing would operate more like an apartment building. We have also connected with YESS; it is supportive of the project and its proposed location across the street. 

    Encampments in the river valley are an ongoing concern.  Faced with a shortage of affordable and supportive housing, along with barriers to accessing shelters, individuals live in encampments throughout our river valley and public spaces across the city. It’s important to note that supportive housing is a permanent home for people who live there. The residents are referred through a process led by Homeward Trust, Alberta Health Services and the operator. It is not a shelter that offers walk-in service to people experiencing homelessness and will not be an immediate resource for people in encampments. The operators of the site help manage visitors to the sites and the property manager will ensure the site is well maintained. The site's proximity to the ravine is not considered a barrier to the project’s successful operation. 

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    In regards to the first question posted, you did not answer the question, "What are the thresholds in regards to community approval? ...." I look forward to hearing your answer.

    RF asked 8 months ago

    The City's engagement is focused on a Good Neighbour Plan, a tool for developing and maintaining a positive relationship between supportive housing and its community. City Council has approved the sale of the land to Homeward Trust, pending the completion of this engagement process and rezoning approvals.