King Edward Park Supportive Housing Good Neighbour Plan and Building Design

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Because of public health restrictions, the City cannot host in-person public engagement as we normally would. Instead, we are using Engaged Edmonton to gather community feedback until 11:55 PM on September 22, 2020.


Have your say:

  1. Watch the video below to learn more about the project.
  2. Fill out a survey on the Good Neighbour Plan and building design.
  3. Ask a question about the project in the tool below.



Want to learn more?

Visit our FAQ and read about the experiences of supportive housing residents.




Because of public health restrictions, the City cannot host in-person public engagement as we normally would. Instead, we are using Engaged Edmonton to gather community feedback until 11:55 PM on September 22, 2020.


Have your say:

  1. Watch the video below to learn more about the project.
  2. Fill out a survey on the Good Neighbour Plan and building design.
  3. Ask a question about the project in the tool below.



Want to learn more?

Visit our FAQ and read about the experiences of supportive housing residents.




Ask a question about the project.

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    In regards to the first question posted, you did not answer the question, "What are the thresholds in regards to community approval? ...." I look forward to hearing your answer.

    RF Asked 7 days ago

    The City's engagement is focused on a Good Neighbour Plan, a tool for developing and maintaining a positive relationship between supportive housing and its community. City Council has approved the sale of the land to Homeward Trust, pending the completion of this engagement process and rezoning approvals. 

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    Why are letters only submitted to houses within 200 metres of the project? Why not letters to the whole community if the whole community will be impacted? In the case of Capilano and KEP locations, this barely goes out to anyone considering the surrounding parks, the businesses and Millcreek Ravine?

    RF Asked 7 days ago

    Letters were sent to homeowners and renters within 60 metres from the titled property and 200 metres from the site itself; more than three times what is required for development permit notifications.

    In King Edward Park and Terrace Heights, 701 and 806 notifications were sent, respectively. Information about the proposed development was shared beyond adjacent residents through site signage, social media ads, the City's weekly engagement public service announcement, outreach to Community Leagues and local media coverage. 

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    It was reported in the news that the land was sold at below market value. Why is that?

    RF Asked 7 days ago

    City Council approved the sale of land to Homeward Trust, a non-profit housing developer, for $1. The City of Edmonton works to meet its housing and homelessness goals by offering land towards the construction of supportive housing. Below-market sales such as this allow non-profit housing developers to put available funding toward construction and other capital costs. 

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    What would the specific resources available at the King Edward location vs. supports offered at the other facilities? You mention in the video that residents will be directed to housing that has supports in place for specific needs. What are the thresholds in regards to community approval? a simple majority for or against deciding if the project goes through? It sounds like from the FAQ's section that the development is set in stone. the community engaugment portion of the conditions is more or less just to help the service provider guidance on how they develop plans. is this correct and if not could you clairify?

    JTD Asked 20 days ago

    Supportive housing offers a range of support services, depending on the needs of its residents. Those services will be determined by the site's operator, a non-profit social service agency. 

    Homeward Trust, the non-profit housing developer and property manager, will select operators for each site through an open Request for Proposals (RFP). After the operator is selected, it works with Homeward Trust and Alberta Health Services to identify residents and tailor the on-site services to their needs. Support can include medication management, mental health services, medical services, cultural, ceremonial and spiritual practices, recreation or support group activities, community-based education, volunteerism and vocational planning, and financial management. 

    The City is collecting input on a Good Neighbour Plan and the look and feel of the buildings. This is intended to help the social and physical integration of supportive housing in the communities where it is proposed. The four sites are proposed on vacant City-owned land. Council approved the sale of the land to Homeward Trust, though the sale is contingent on the completion of public engagement and rezoning approvals for McArthur/Wellington, King Edward Park and Terrace Heights.