LDA20-0229 Holyrood Gardens DC2 Adjustments

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

Thank you for your interest. This conversation has closed. Here is the What We Heard Report.


This page replaces in-person engagement to help you get information and find out what you think about the proposed land use changes.

This application proposes to make adjustments to a recently approved Site Specific Development Control Provision (DC2.1001).

Please watch the video and review the information on this page. Tell us what you think and ask any questions below, before the end of the day on November 30, 2020.

** The Transportation Impact Assessment referenced in the video as forthcoming is now available for review. This draft is under review by City engineers. Before the City concludes their analysis, we welcome your feedback to make sure our analysis is as comprehensive as possible. **

The existing DC2.1001 Provision was approved on July 9, 2018 and allows for a mixed use primarily high density residential development which includes 10 buildings and up to 1300 residential units. The primary change with this rezoning is to increase the total number of allowable units to 1750, an increase of 450 units. Other related changes to site layout, building size, setbacks and parking are described on the Application Website and the above video.

Zoning regulates what types of buildings are allowed on a site (eg. residential or commercial) and the basic size and shape of those buildings. It does not control who can live or work in the buildings or whether the property is rented or owned. Please see the sidebar for more information on what factors are considered when processing rezoning applications and how feedback will be used.

If you like to stay up to date on this application, please add your email address to our mailing list.

We will use any feedback that you share to make sure our review of the application is as complete as possible, and will also summarize it for City Council so that they know your perspective prior to making a decision.

Thank you for your interest. This conversation has closed. Here is the What We Heard Report.


This page replaces in-person engagement to help you get information and find out what you think about the proposed land use changes.

This application proposes to make adjustments to a recently approved Site Specific Development Control Provision (DC2.1001).

Please watch the video and review the information on this page. Tell us what you think and ask any questions below, before the end of the day on November 30, 2020.

** The Transportation Impact Assessment referenced in the video as forthcoming is now available for review. This draft is under review by City engineers. Before the City concludes their analysis, we welcome your feedback to make sure our analysis is as comprehensive as possible. **

The existing DC2.1001 Provision was approved on July 9, 2018 and allows for a mixed use primarily high density residential development which includes 10 buildings and up to 1300 residential units. The primary change with this rezoning is to increase the total number of allowable units to 1750, an increase of 450 units. Other related changes to site layout, building size, setbacks and parking are described on the Application Website and the above video.

Zoning regulates what types of buildings are allowed on a site (eg. residential or commercial) and the basic size and shape of those buildings. It does not control who can live or work in the buildings or whether the property is rented or owned. Please see the sidebar for more information on what factors are considered when processing rezoning applications and how feedback will be used.

If you like to stay up to date on this application, please add your email address to our mailing list.

We will use any feedback that you share to make sure our review of the application is as complete as possible, and will also summarize it for City Council so that they know your perspective prior to making a decision.

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

You can:

  • Ask a question directly to the file planner that is processing the application. When necessary, we will work with the applicant to provide an answer.

  • Search and view community-submitted questions and official responses.

  • Type your question in the box below and click "Submit". Answers are provided within 5 business days.

  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Suppose someone who lives at the site owns a car and uses it for daily commuting, but parks it on a residential street a couple of blocks away because she does not have an assigned parking space on site. Does the Traffic Impact Assessment count trips made using this car as site generated traffic?

    Mike B asked 5 months ago

    Thanks for you question.

    The transportation study attempts to estimate all vehicle trip activity associated with the site. In this way, the study accounts for this trip. However, the study assumes that development-related vehicle trips start and end at the development. This is standard in transportation studies in that generally the activity with a site is assigned to the site, unless parking is known not to be provided or otherwise significantly constrained. So while the study accounts for this trip’s impact on the broader network, the exact travel patterns for it may not be entirely accounted for. 

  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    In the draft Traffic Impact Assessment, Table 5.1 summarizes daily traffic volumes for selected streets in the vicinity of the proposed development. Why doesn't this table include 85th Street, which is an arterial roadway adjacent to the site? Table 5.1 also indicates that daily site generated traffic volumes in the North-South Alley in 2050 are predicted to be as follows: South of 95 Avenue : 156 vehicles per day North of 93 Avenue : zero vehicles per day South of 93 Avenue: zero vehicles per day North of 91 Avenue: zero vehicles per day In contrast, the same table indicates that in the under the current zoning (2018 TIA), the site generated traffic volumes at these same segments in 2047 are predicted to be 521, 313, 237, and 237 vehicles per day. Can you share some insight as to how the proposed rezoning will facilitate such spectacular reductions of site generated traffic in the North-South alley, even as total site generated traffic is projected to increase in lockstep with the proposed 37.5% percent increase in housing units?

    Mike B asked 5 months ago

    Thanks for your questions.

    This Traffic Impact Assessment submitted by the developer is still under review by the City and has not yet been accepted.

    The purpose of Table 5.1 is to compare traffic volumes with a previous transportation assessment completed in support of the Holyrood Gardens rezoning. The City will be requesting that the applicant update the assessment to include comparisons of 85 Street.

    In terms of the alley volumes, the consultant’s draft assessment concludes that segments of the alleys will not see an increase in traffic volumes, which is a change from the previous analysis and is currently under review by the City. The City will be requesting the applicant to address the discrepancy in alley traffic volumes before the report is accepted. 

  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Why do the sun-shadow studies only go until 4 pm in the March/Sept example (AVG sunset 7/8 pm), show semi-darkness at 6 pm in the June example (AVG sunset 9 pm), and show almost complete darkness at 2 pm in Dec (AVG. sunset after 4 pm)? This is the same issue that took place in the original DC2, where the community had to pay out of pocket for a thorough shadow impact assessment. Will the community be asked to provide this crucial piece of information again?

    MeganW asked 5 months ago

    Thank you for your question.

    Shadows near (1-2 hrs before) sunset are very long, even for a short building like a house, so these times are not very useful for looking at shadow impacts of proposed buildings because most of the area is already covered in shadow from existing buildings. As a result, having our software run images for this time of day is not very effective because it is very difficult to differentiate between the shadows from the proposed buildings and the existing buildings in the image. 

    We certainly do not want residents to feel that they have to pay out of pocket for their own sun shadow impact assessment.  If there are specific dates/times for which you wish to see a shadow comparison, please email the file planner at andrew.mclellan@edmonton.ca and we will find a way to produce an image that shows these shadows for your review.

  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Why is Strathearn development not included in the new traffic study you are doing?

    Cindy asked 5 months ago

    Thank you for your question.

    The new Transportation Impact Assessment uses the City’s latest 2050 traffic model.  Compared to the 2047 traffic model used with the application that created the current DC2 Provision, the 2050 model includes the recent rezoning of Bonnie Doon Mall and the currently proposed rezoning of Strathearn Heights (not currently approved).

  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    In terms of the zoning regulations and what is currently noted as "Minor Alcohol Sales" and is being requested to be revised to "Liquor Stores". The current wording sounds more specific and implies a defined scale of business whereas the proposed revised seems to imply a larger scale and multiple stores. I would like to understand more about these proposed changes as Liquor stores can bring longer business hours that extend well into the evening and therefore more traffic to a very residential neighborhood during later evening hours.

    Kristina asked 4 months ago

    Thank you for your question.


    On June 17, 2019, City Council approved an amendment to the Edmonton Zoning Bylaw that consolidated the Uses of Minor Alcohol Sales and Major Alcohol Sales into one Use: Liquor Stores.  


    In short, the rationale for this was that the only distinction between the two was based on Floor Area and analysis of past Development Permits identified that there was no land use impact related rationale to maintain the distinction.  Some of the highest volume retailers by sales and traffic, were classified as Minor Alcohol Sales, while some lower volume retailers by sales and traffic were Major Alcohol Sales.  


    You can find out more information about this change by reviewing the minutes from the June 17, 2019 Public Hearing.  It was dealt with in Item 3.5 on that agenda.


    Because Minor Alcohol Sales and Major Alcohol Sales are no longer Uses within the Zoning Bylaw, Administration cannot bring a DC2 Provision to Council for consideration that contains these Uses.  Liquor Stores must be used in this proposed DC2 Provision for Holyrood Gardens.